Saturday Night #Thunder

Feb 24 2014 Published by under Uncategorized

Saturday evening I attended a very special event that I was banned from discussing until now.

In a children's hospital, you get used to celebrities doing things. Local personalities hand out goodies, making our patients and themselves a little happier in the process. Most of the time, they seem to target two patient groups. Premature babies get a lot of love, as do the kids with cancer. Other patients with chronic diseases receive less media attention. Kids with cancer might DIE! Children on dialysis will get transplants and be cured, right?

Not always. And a kidney transplant is hardly a cure, given life-long risks of immunosuppression.

I was delighted a few weeks back to hear that a local star wanted to do a party with our dialysis kids. Not only were they (finally) getting some special attention, but the celebrity would be my favorite OKC Thunder player, Serge Ibaka. My excitement was tempered by the fact that at first we nephrologists were not invited to the party.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

I pouted a bit, but accepted my missed opportunity.

A few days later, I got the call that I could come. None of my family could come with me, but I was welcome to watch my patients interact and have some fun. I also was not to bring a phone or camera, although being on call meant I had to bring the phone. This loophole allowed me to take my completely unofficial illicit photo of the shot blocker at right. That's just the kind of rebel I am, folks.

The event took place in the hospital play zone. Each patient and their immediate family spent about 15 minutes alone with Serge (I shook his hand, I can call him that now, right?) and the kids got personalized Thunder jerseys, autographed in most cases. Then we all came together and he answered questions from the patients. After a group photo, he then shot baskets against the kids on an arcade basketball game (one girl even beat him; she is still glowing). Afterwards, he even posed for selfies with some of the teens. I have never seen such big smiles on the faces of these children; dialysis appointments rarely make you happy.

Things I learned or confirmed?

  1. Standing next to a 6'10" guy makes me feel even smaller than usual.
  2. During the games, Serge looks fierce, like he would not mind breaking your nose. In real life he is charming and quite attractive (and roughly the same age as my children; I have already heard all the Mrs. Robinson jokes this weekend, thanks).
  3. He speaks 5 languages, including his Congo tribal tongue, French, Spanish, Catalan, and English. Many of our patients and families have Spanish as their first language, so this was another delight.

Saturday's event left me with such a happy feeling. I am hoping others will take on the fight for kids with less publicly emphasized disorders, including the drive to raise money for research and treatment. All children deserve to have their health struggles acknowledged.

Thanks, Serge. Now go block some shots.

 

 

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